This section provides details, profiles, and general information about some of the creatures living in the Old World - and which form a part of the game. The list is not intended to be comprehensive, nor are the descriptions to be regarded as inviolable; gamesmasters who want to create their own monsters should treat the entries as examples and invent whatever new and interesting monstrosities they like.

The various creatures are presented in five sections: Humanoids, Animals & Monsters, Undead, Elementals, and Daemons.

Humanoid creatures comprise the majority of intelligent monsters, as well as characters, hirelings, and so on. Since they behave - by and large - in a manner comparible to Humans, these creatures are the easiest to roleplay and will generally behave in a rational manner.

Animals & Monsters include a representative selection of the many varieties of ordinary and fantastic creatures which inhabit the Old World - from Amoebae to Scorpions. Most of these creatures have at least an animal level of intelligence and their main motivation is usually food!

Undead include both animated corpses (such as Zombies and Skeletons) and more powerful creatures who are sustained by extra-planar energies - either directly or by Necromancers and other evil, magic-using monsters. Ethereal Undead are those monsters which lack a material existence - they can be seen in this world, but they are not wholly part of it. Generally, they exist only as apparitions or pure energy. GMs should try to present these creatures as the ghostly uncertain images that they are, sometimes appearing substantial, at other times as mere shadows or glowing lights.

Elementals are manifestations of the natural forces inherent in the four elements of Earth, Water, Air, and Fire. They can take on many different shapes, often depending on the circumstances of their manifestation; as most Elementals are summoned by elementalist wizards or druidic priests, they usually respond by taking humanoid form.

Daemons are the servants of various malign deities and do not belong to the material world. The appearance of one of these horrific creatures is usually the result either of a direct command from the deity it serves or of a powerful magical summons from a character in the material world. Daemons can never be 'killed' - instead they are forced to retreat back to their home plane, where they slowly heal their wounds and plot their revenge...

Champions And Heroes[edit | edit source]

The basic profiles given for each creature are meant to be the average values typical of that monster. However, as with characters, some creatures may be less powerful, some may be more so. Gamesmasters should feel free to use slightly more or less powerful versions of standard creatures as necessary.

Sometimes you will feel the need to create an instant 'Orc Hero', 'Skeleton Champion', or whatever. Using the following system, you can create Champions and Minor or Major Heroes. This is especially useful for undead creatures, because some kinds of undead require the presence of other more powerful undead if they are to function correctly.

Champions have normal characteristics for their kind, but gain +10 to WS, BS, I, and +1 to S.

Minor Heroes gain the following bonuses:

M

WS

BS

S

T

W

I

A

Dex

Ld

Int

Cl

WP

Fel

0

+20

+20

+1

+1

+D6

+20

+1

+10

+10

+10

+10

+10

0

Major Heroes gain the following bonuses:

M

WS

BS

S

T

W

I

A

Dex

Ld

Int

Cl

WP

Fel

0

+30

+30

+1

+1

+2D6

+30

+2

+20

+20

+20

+20

+20

0

These three categories of non-standard creatures are only convenient generalisations - you may change any details to suit your game where you think it is beneficial to do so.

Monster Attacks[edit | edit source]

Those monsters which do not use weapons may have one or more of the following attacks: biteclawconstrictiongazegorekick/stomptail lash.

Bite attacks may only be directed to the creature's front.

Claw attacks include punches, rending talons, and so on. These may only be made to the front or sides.

Constriction attacks (made by snakes, octopi, etc.) may be made in any direction and have a chance of pinning the victim's arms on a successful hit. Roll 1D6: a result of 1 or 2 means both arms are pinned (the victim may not attack); 3 to 5 means one arm is pinned (50% chance that this is the victim's sword arm); 6 means the victim has both arms free. Characters hit by a constriction attack will suffer wounds automatically until released. This may be achieved either by killing/disabling the constricting creature or by making a successful S test (possibly with some modifiers to the die roll - see the monster description).

Gaze attacks can be directed to the front or sides and can only affect one creature per round. Characters can attempt to avoid a creature's gaze by covering or otherwise averting their eyes, but this will never be possible if the creature attacks with surprise. Characters who are avoiding a gaze attack suffer a -25% penalty to WS and BS and are attacked by the creatures with a bonus of +25% to WS.

Gore attacks involve the use of a creature's horns or tusks and can only take place to the front.

Kick/stomp attacks include trampling, butting, and generally flailing around. They may be made in any direction - to the front, sides, or rear.

Tail lash attacks only apply if the creature's tail is suitably armed or armoured. They can be made to the sides or rear.

Monster Descriptions[edit | edit source]

In general, each entry comprises a brief description of the habitat, tactics, and motivations of each creature, together with any relevant historical notes. This is followed by a description of the creature's physical appearance, notes on alignment, and any psychological traits.

These details list one or more of the Standard Tests which the creature might have to make because of its psychological make-up. Some creatures are also able to produce a reaction (e.g., fear) in characters encountering them and these are also listed here. The Standard Tests which fall into this category are: Animosity, Fear, Frenzy, Hatred, Stupidity, and Terror. For example, Dwarfs are Subject to Hatred towards all goblinoids.

Special Rules[edit | edit source]

Alcoholism[edit | edit source]

The effects of this addiction on Player Characters are covered in the section on Alcoholism. The gamesmaster can decide whether monsters  with this affliction will be drunk when encountered by rolling a D6 - the creature will be drunk on a result of 1. A drunken creature will have WS, BS, I, Dex, Ld, Cl, and WP reduced by 5%. If given the opportunity to consume more alcohol, the creature must make a successful WP test or succumb to the temptation. Each drink reduces all of the above characteristics by a further 5%.

Infected Wounds[edit | edit source]

The attacks of some creatures are described as having a percentage chance of causing infected wounds. If a character is wounded by such an attack, the gamesmaster should roll D100 and if the result is equal to or less than the number given, the character must make a Disease test (against Tx10) with a penalty of -5% for each W inflicted. If the test is failed, the wound will become infected.

Instability[edit | edit source]

Creatures such as Undead, Elementals, and Demons, which do no naturally belong to the planes of the real world, are subject to instability. Shifts between the different planes can seriously affect these creatures, sometimes even destroying them. Instability can usually be avoided if the creatures are controlled by a more powerful commander, such as a Wizard or a Champion, or if they remain within certain special areas where instability has no effect. Where relevant, these areas are described with the creature concerned, but, for example, haunted houses and graveyards may prevent instability in certain classes of Undead. When running scenarios, gamesmasters should make careful notes of any areas where given creatures are not subject to instability.

Flying Creatures[edit | edit source]

The M score for winged creatures applies to ground movement only. When airborne, their movement depends on the manoeuvrability of the creature involved. Flying creatures are split into three categories and, for ease of calculation, the height of a creature above the ground is reckoned in increments of 10 yards:

Swoopers are strong flyers that can dive and climb easily (+/- 20 yards per round).

Hoverers are relatively weak flyers, but are more or less able to maintain their position in the air (climb 10 yards, dive 20 yards per round).

Landers are poor flyers who are clumsy and slow in the air (+/- 10 yards per round).

Additional details of movement rates and other information are contained in Moving.

The Bestiary[edit | edit source]

Humanoid Creatures[edit | edit source]

Animals & Monsters[edit | edit source]

Undead[edit | edit source]

Elementals[edit | edit source]

Daemons[edit | edit source]

NPC Characters[edit | edit source]

Listed below are some example profiles for a variety of careers and types of characters, provided for the GM's quick reference. These can be used when rolling up a character for a minor or unexpected encounter would be unncessary or time-consuming.

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